The Asylum Hump: Why Country Income Level Predicts New Asylum Seekers, But Not New Refugees

My colleagues Constantin Ruhe, Lisa Groß and I have a new article out in the Journal of Refugee Studies! I won't post a PDF because it's open access, so anyone can download if for free. We dig into the question about why GDP per capita has not generally been a good predictor of new refugees. … Continue reading The Asylum Hump: Why Country Income Level Predicts New Asylum Seekers, But Not New Refugees

Data Protection in Humanitarian Contexts

I was scanning Twitter this morning and came across this IRIN article on how aid agencies will have to rethink their data protection and privacy standards as the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation comes into effect. It raised a number of interesting personal data issues across the full spectrum of the humanitarian and NGO … Continue reading Data Protection in Humanitarian Contexts

Where Are the Legislators (Who Ostensibly Pay for Data)?

I watched from a distance on Twitter as the World Bank hosted its annual data event. I would love to have attended - the participants were a pretty amazing collection of economists, data professionals and academics. This tweet seemed to resonate with a theme I've been focused on the last week or so: There is … Continue reading Where Are the Legislators (Who Ostensibly Pay for Data)?

How Is Public Data Produced?

The 2016 Global Peace Index (GPI) launched recently. Along with its usual ranking of most to least peaceful countries it included a section analyzing the capacity for the global community to effectively measure progress in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically Goal 16, the peace goal. The GPI's analysis of statistical capacity (pp. 73-94) motivates a critical question: … Continue reading How Is Public Data Produced?

MCIT/NUS ICTs in Emergency Survey: Replication data

I spent the last two months managing a research collaboration between Samoa's Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (MCIT) and the National University of Samoa, collecting nation wide data on how people use information and information technology to respond to natural disasters. This data will feed into my dissertation, as well as be useful to … Continue reading MCIT/NUS ICTs in Emergency Survey: Replication data

Finding Big Data’s Place in Conflict Analysis

Daniel Solomon recently posted a piece on how we conceptualize (and often misconceptualize) the role of big data in conflict event prediction. His post got me thinking about what role big data plays in conflict analysis. This comes on the heels of Chris Neu's post on the TechChange blog about the limits of using crowdsourcing to … Continue reading Finding Big Data’s Place in Conflict Analysis